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Comprendre la DIN : La Norme de Tension des Fixations de Ski Alpin






If you practice alpine skiing, you have probably heard of the DIN, but do you really know what it means? The DIN, or Deutsches Institut für Normung, is a standard that defines the tension of alpine ski bindings. Understanding the DIN is essential to ensure your safety on the slopes.







What is DIN and why is it important?

The DIN is a measurement of the tension necessary to release your ski boot from the binding in the event of a fall. This tension is adjusted according to your weight, your skiing level and your riding style. A properly adjusted DIN ensures that your skis stay attached when skiing normally, but detach in the event of a fall to prevent injury.

Where can you see the DIN?

The DIN is usually listed on the ski binding itself, near the area where you can adjust the tension using a screwdriver. This information is essential because it allows you to quickly check whether the DIN is correctly set for your weight and skiing level before heading out on the slopes. It is important not to ignore this indication and to ensure that the DIN is always appropriate to guarantee safe practice of alpine skiing.

Risks of an incorrect DIN:

  • DIN too low: If your DIN is set too low for your weight and skiing level, your bindings could come loose too easily, which can lead to loss of control or injury in the event of a fall.

  • DIN too high: Conversely, a DIN that is too high can make it difficult to release your bindings in the event of a fall, increasing the risk of knee or ligament injuries.

How to adjust your DIN:

  1. Consult a professional: It is recommended to have your DIN adjusted by a professional at a specialist ski shop. They will take into account your weight, height, skiing level and other factors to determine the appropriate DIN.

  2. Use a tuning chart: Some ski shops use tuning charts based on specific calculations to determine your DIN. These charts take into account variables like your age, gender, and skill level to get an accurate setting.

Can I adjust my DIN myself?

Although it is possible to adjust your DIN yourself using a screwdriver on the fixings, this is not recommended. Professionals have the experience and knowledge necessary to make a precise adjustment that will guarantee your safety on the slopes.

Additional elements on the DIN

  1. Check your DIN regularly: Your weight, your ski level and even your riding style can change over time. It is therefore important to have your DIN checked and adjusted regularly so that it remains suitable for your practice.

  2. Temperature Impact: Extreme temperatures can affect the spring tension of bindings. In very cold weather the DIN may seem higher, while in hot weather it may seem lower. Be sure to take this into account when hitting the slopes.

Example of a charter for adjusting the DIN

Here is an example of a chart that can be used as a guide for adjusting the DIN of alpine ski bindings. This charter is based on the weight of the skier and their skill level:

Sole length

<251

251 to 270

271 to 290

291 to 310

311 to 330

>330

Weight of the skier in KG







10/17


0.75





18/21

1.25

1

0.75




22/25

1.5

1.25

1.25

1



26/30

2

1.75

1.5

1.25

1.25


31/35

2.5

2.25

2

1.75

1.5

1.5

36/41

3

2.75

2.5

2.25

2

1.75

42/48


3.5

3.25

2.75

2.5

2.25

49/57


4.25

4

3.75

3.5

3

58/66


5.5

5

4.5

4

3.5

67/78


6.5

6

5.5

5

4.5

79/94


7.5

7

6.5

6

5.5

>94



8.5

8

7

6.5

This charter is a general guide and may vary depending on the recommendations of the manufacturer of your bindings and the specific conditions of your practice. It is always best to consult a professional in a specialized ski store to obtain a precise adjustment of your DIN.


In conclusion, the DIN is a crucial standard to ensure your safety in alpine skiing. By understanding it, correctly adjusting your DIN and having it checked regularly by a professional, you can enjoy your sport in complete safety.

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